House Plants that are Dangerous to Cats

House and garden plants that are potentially poisonous are rarely eaten by cats, but cats may occasionally chew at certain house plants when bored.

Examples include sheep laurel and mountain laurel used for floral decorations in North America, azaleas, chrysanthemum, dieffenbachia (dumb cane), ivy, philodendron, and poinsettias.

In most cases signs include vomiting, diarrhea, or nervous symptoms.
Pine needles from Christmas trees and the water from the base both contain irritant tar products. If you suspect your cat has eaten something poisonous take immediate action.  Calling the poison control center and/or your vet is always the best action.

If your cat has swallowed poisons:
The cat may or may not vomit afterwards. DON’T GIVE AN EMETIC IF THE CAT HAS SWALLOWED ACIDS, CAUSTICS OR PETROLEUM PRODUCTS OR IT ISN’T CONSCIOUS OR ABLE TO SWALLOW.

Under any other circumstances, induce vomiting by giving an emetic. (refer to list)

Chemicals on your cat’s skin.
These must be washed off as soon as possible. For most chemicals use large amounts of water or dunk the animal in the bath. For petroleum products and turpentine use vegetable oil or margarine, then wash with a mild soap.

USEFUL EMETICS FROM THE KITCHEN CUPBOARD;

1. Give one teaspoon (5ml) of 10 volume (3%) hydrogen peroxide solution.

2. Dissolve a tablespoon of bicarbonate of soda in quarter cup of water, give 1-2 teaspoons (5-10ml);

3. Dissolve 1 tablespoon of salt in half cup of water give 2 teaspoons (10m).;

4. Place 1/2 teaspoonful of salt on the back of the tongue.